Ineluctably Constructed

- And every moment is a new and shocking valuation of all you have been -


every answer is a form of death - ask me  
Reblogged from englishsnow
Reblogged from ceedling
You may not agree with a woman, but to criticize her appearance — as opposed to her ideas or actions — isn’t doing anyone any favors, least of all you. Insulting a woman’s looks when they have nothing to do with the issue at hand implies a lack of comprehension on your part, an inability to engage in high-level thinking. You may think she’s ugly, but everyone else thinks you’re an idiot. Hillary Clinton  (via neonchills)

(Source: ceedling, via copperqueens)

Cardamom ice cream for breakfast

Cardamom ice cream for breakfast

Reblogged from fuckinmiki
fishingboatproceeds:

fuckinmiki:

The official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup is beautiful

CAN’T WAIT.

fishingboatproceeds:

fuckinmiki:

The official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup is beautiful

CAN’T WAIT.

(via copperqueens)

Reblogged from intuitiveunderstanding
My youngest flaunts her mind, and frightens away the suitors.

- Louis Nicolas le Tonnerlier de Breteuil, on his daughter, the raddest person in history, Émilie du Châtelet. Emilie was a scientist in the 18th century who proved Newton’s ideas on velocity wrong. She also played a role in helping Einstein figure out E = mcwith E=mv2 (via intuitiveunderstanding)

Also, “frightens away the suitors” = BS. Emilie du Chatelet was a hustler. Fucking Voltaire was her personal man-candy. Her husband was apparently totally cool with it. The historical record did not preserve evidence for or against a threesome.

#girls don’t you go feeling like you don’t got any role models ‘cause you got role models like damn  #it just takes a little more work to find out about them is all

(via vorvayne)

When she was a 27-year-old mother of three, du Châtelet began perhaps the most passionate affair of her life—a true partnership of heart and mind. Her lover, the writer Voltaire, recounted later, “In the year 1733 I met a young lady who happened to think nearly as I did.” She and Voltaire shared deep interests: in political reform, in the fun of fast conversations, and, above all, in advancing science as much as they could.” —pbs.org

(via okayophelia)

(via auburnailurophile)

Reblogged from micdotcom

micdotcom:

Woman live tweets IBM execs discussing why they don’t hire women, tries not to throw up

Toronto-based editor Lyndsay Kirkham has started a firestorm this week after overhearing what was apparently an incredibly sexist conversation between IBM executives at lunch — and live-tweeting it.

Unaware that they were transmitting sexist nonsense to cyberspace, the IBM executives openly discussed “why they don’t hire women.” If you take Kirkham’s account at its word, it actually gets way worse.

But wait, there’s more Follow micdotcom

(via auburnailurophile)

Reblogged from millionsmillions
Between the 1880s and World War I, Hawthorne worked as the literary editor of the New York World, interviewed Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, covered the scandalous Stanford White murder case, reported on the 1900 Galveston hurricane and starvation in India, published five detective novels, became a friend of presidential hopeful William Jennings Bryan, and wrote frequently about sports for various newspapers (being among the first to predict the greatness of Babe Ruth). But needing money in 1908, Hawthorne foolishly lent his name and pen to what turned out to be a bogus silver mine scheme. Convicted of fraud, he served a prison term — and in 1914 produced a major exposé of penal conditions called The Subterranean Brotherhood. He befriended Mark Twain. His father wrote The Scarlet LetterHe drank wine with Oscar Wilde, George Eliot and Henry James, and William Randolph Hearst once hired him as a reporter. He even published a few books to critical acclaim. So why do so few of us know anything about Julian Hawthorne? In the WaPoMichael Dirda reviews a new biography. (h/t Arts and Letters Daily)
Reblogged from nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.
He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 
Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

nprfreshair:

George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.

He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 

Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.

That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

(via npr)

Reblogged from broadwaydivaintraining

broadwaydivaintraining:

Stephen Sondheim is my hero.

(Source: broadwaydivaintraining, via auburnailurophile)

Reblogged from liquidnight
Stuff your eyes with wonder … live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories.

Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

(via liquidnight)

(via auburnailurophile)

Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia